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A Dream Scenario For Mike Mularkey

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May 6, 2012; Jacksonville FL, USA; Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Mike Mularkey talks with the media after rookie mini camp at Florida Blue Health & Wellness Practice Fields. Mandatory Credit: Phil Sears-US PRESSWIRE
May 6, 2012; Jacksonville FL, USA; Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Mike Mularkey talks with the media after rookie mini camp at Florida Blue Health & Wellness Practice Fields. Mandatory Credit: Phil Sears-US PRESSWIRE

Imagine this scenario: Mike Mularkey comes in as the new head coach. He inherits an offense that was the worst in the AFC.

He installs his own offense and picks a new offensive staff. He has a new first round draft pick wide receiver that he adds to the offense. There are minor changes on the offensive line, but the quarterback is the same and the tight end is the same.

The defense is largely unchanged except for a new starting defensive end and a new defensive back, but a strong linebackers group stays intact.

The offense starts slow at first, scoring an average of 13 points a game through the first 6 games. But then as the players started getting the offense down, the team explodes, averaging 32 points per game over the last 10 games of the season.

The team finishes the season with the offense ranked in the top ten.

As the team's offense starts clicking, the wins start rolling in. The team wins 8 of the last ten games.

Does this sound like a good scenario? Could it really happen?

Well, it did happen.

This is what happened in Buffalo in 2004 when Mularkey took over the Buffalo Bills. The Bills had been ranked 30thin the league the year before but shot up to 7th in the league under Mularkey.

There are similarities between the Bills and Jaguars here but there are also differences. The Bills had an experience quarterback in Drew Bledsoe. They also had an experienced wide receiver in Eric Moulds. However, the rookie wide receiver on the Bills that year was Lee Evans.

When Lee Evans began working out with the Jaguars this offseason he mentioned that he likes this offense. He said that it takes a little while for all the pieces of the offense to start clicking but when they do, the offense is hard to stop. The statistics above show that was exactly what seemed to happen with the Bills in 2004.

Maybe it's too much to hope for such a dramatic improvement for the Jaguars this year, but I like that Mularkey has been in an offensive remodeling job in the past. Anyway, I like having something to build my hope for my Jaguars dreams this year and this helps.

We're still over two weeks away from training camp so let me dream a little.